What Size Should You Print Your Images?

 Wall display showing different size prints.

I wanted to show a quick overview of different print sizes and how cropping your images may effect the overall look of your portrait. As you can see in the above example, 5x7 and 8x10 prints (often referred to as 'gift prints') are best for displaying on a table or desk. They are typically considered too small for a wall print. For your wall, go big or go home! j/k :) But honestly, the bigger the better. 

Your gallery from Jessica Doffing Photography contains images left at the standard 2x3 ratio, except for any special composites or collages that were designed...more about that later.

 Farm theme cake smash with barn and farm animals and baby boy smashing birthday cake.

So, with a 2x3 ratio, this image will look best as a 4x6, 8x12, 16x24, etc. With these dimensions, no part of the image will need to be cropped out.

For some reason, 5x7 and 8x10 seem to be very standard size gift prints. Check out the examples below showing how much of the image needs to be cropped out in order to fit these sizes.

 5x7 crop

5x7 crop

 8x10 crop

8x10 crop

Because these sizes are so popular, I purposefully try to keep a nice wide range around the subject (in this case, little farmer Oliver) so that he will never need to be cropped out. However, sometimes the little details in the scene are kind of important too, and you may lose them. It also changes the aesthetic of the overall image if you want to get into all of the 'rules' of photography like rule of thirds, leading lines, etc. 

Here is an example of an 8x10 crop that I feel is too tight and constrictive for the overall image. My suggestion would be to print this as an 8x12 instead.

 8x10 too tight

8x10 too tight

I try to include a collage of all of the little baby parts in my newborn galleries. These are designed in a square, 2x2 ratio. These should always be printed as a square...either 8x8, 10x10, and so on. It is impossible to not cut off crucial parts of the image in any other ratio and it just looks 'off'.

10x10 original                                    8x10 crop                                        10x8 crop

I hope this has helped explain a little about cropping your photos and how to get the best results when ordering prints. I would be more than happy to come out to assist you if you would like some ideas and suggestions for printing and hanging your portraits in your home. We need to get those pictures off of your computer and on your walls!

Let me know if this has been helpful or if you have any questions. Leave your likes and comments below. Thank you!!